09.26.17

Capito Legislation to Promote Women’s Participation in Conflict Resolution and Peacekeeping Heads to President’s Desk

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. House of Representatives last night unanimously passed the Women, Peace and Security Act, bipartisan legislation introduced by U.S. Senators Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.) and Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.) that advocates for women’s engagement and participation in conflict resolution and peace-building around the world. The bill passed the Senate in August and will now head to President Trump’s desk.
 
“Women bring so much to the table when it comes to solving problems and resolving conflicts, and our bipartisan legislation will promote their inclusion in peacekeeping and mediation efforts,” Senator Capito said. “I’m proud to have worked with Senator Shaheen to introduce this important measure in the Senate, and now that the House has passed it, I am hopeful President Trump will sign it into law.”
 
“Women are significantly underrepresented in the peace-building and conflict resolution process, yet they are disproportionately impacted by violence and armed conflict,” Senator Shaheen said. “They deserve to be fully represented at the negotiating table. This bipartisan legislation will ensure that U.S. diplomats, military personnel and development workers are trained to promote the inclusion of women in peacemaking processes and that the U.S. continues to implement United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 on the role of women in peace and security.”
 
The Women, Peace and Security Act advances the priorities outlined in the United States’ National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security, and ensures the U.S. continues to advocate for women’s inclusion and engagement in the peace-building process to prevent, moderate and resolve violent conflict.
 
According to the Council on Foreign Relations, between 1992 and 2011, women represented fewer than 4 percent of signatories to peace agreements and 9 percent of negotiators. In 2015, only 3 percent of UN military peacekeepers and 10 percent of UN police personnel were women.

 

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